Coaching for conflict resolution

I spoke about the challenging conflicts in one’s life, and tendencies and triggers that initiate them in my Propensity blog (http://yoginiteachings.wordpress.com/2014/10/12/propensity/). When a client presents a situation where there is a conflict and inclination for them to respond in a certain way; it is helpful to provide them a different perspective from the one that they have considering that we often develop farsighted vision while having the experience.

There are ways one might consider during the coaching conversation for conflict resolution. The most basic level one is to coach the individual specific to the situation around their responses. This is often demonstrated in the entry levels into the coaching and often the actions come up during the conversation are related to activities to be performed where client choses one way over the other in their responses towards the resolution of the issue outwardly. My experience revealed to me that these conversations often go in a direction towards how client can be more defensive around the conflict and how they can manage the conflict towards a win-win.

One of the deeper approaches to the situation is to invite client to reflect internally to understand what the root of the propensity is within. Where else the client is having similar conflicts in their life and to have the conversation around that. This requires more profound understanding of emotions and beliefs for the coach to guide the client through their experience. In this scenario client’s emotions and beliefs are explored for specific propensities and their response to processing them.

The final way I will present here is requires a bit of a self-reflection and spiritual advancement work at the coach’s end in order for them to take the client into such depths in their spiritual development. It is said that one cannot coach someone who is spiritually more advanced than them. By spiritually, I am not speaking about religious acts, rather one’s deeper understanding of their journey as a soul. In this conversation, the coach invites client to understand where the client is in their developmental process as a soul. The inquiries employed in such conversations will seek to understand what is the client learning in this life with the propensities they employed as a tool for such learning; how are the propensities creating certain conflicts and events for them to heal through and learn…

Of course it is always important to remember staying with the client, respect to their choices for exploration and resolution.

With joy and grace,

Tijen Genco, PCC, MS, MBB

Executive and Life Coach

Published by Tijen Genco

Tijen Genco is a certified Professional and Life Coach. Her client portfolio include C-Level senior executives, division heads, and chiefs of staff across wide variety of fortune 100 companies; country managers of non-profit organizations; entrepreneurs, lawyers, and seasoned coaches. Tijen holds Master of Science degree in Management with concentrations in Organizational Behavior and Coaching from the University of Texas at Dallas. She has obtained Master Black Belt in Lean/Six Sigma Productivity Improvement Methodology from Merck Sigma Center of Excellence. Tijen’s engagements as trusted advisor and management consultant have resulted in multi-million dollars in productivity benefits for fortune 100 companies. Tijen holds certification in various Yoga methodologies, Pilates and Meditation. As a wellness coach she has been instructing mind-body classes at prestigious clubs in the US since 2008. Tijen specializes in Executive Coaching, Organizational Development and Cultural Transformation along with Process Excellence. She provides individual as well as group/team coaching and workshops to corporate clients and private audiences worldwide. Tijen is passionate about social issues and participates in Social Responsibility efforts. She extends her specialty of cultural transformation and behavioral changes in the healthcare industry to non-profit organizations for enabling desired behaviors towards better health. In 2013, she served 3 months in India helping to improve the quality of Maternal Health services in the rural areas, coaching non-Government Organization resources. She has served at the board of International Coaching Federation (ICF), Philadelphia Chapter, as the VP of Education and Professional Development. Along the side of her coaching business, she is chairing the Global Executive Coaching Community of Practice of ICF, and instructing mind-body classes.

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